Basic Clinical Radiobiology

Sydney, Australia

Learn all the fundamental principles of clinical radiobiology that underpin daily decisions about the best way to treat your patients. This vitally important knowledge provides the basis for everything you do in the clinic.

 

The course is aimed at:

  • Trainees in radiotherapy
  • Radiation oncologists who lack basic radiobiological science or who want to update their knowledge (i.e. for CME)
  • Medical physicists who wish to familiarize themselves with this field
  • Physicians from other disciplines administering ionising radiation
  • Radiation therapists (RTTs).

Course director

Michael Joiner, Radiation Biologist, Wayne State University, Detroit (USA)

Teachers

  • Rob Coppes, Radiation Biologist, UMC Groningen, Groningen (NL)
  • Karin Haustermans, Radiation Oncologist, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (BE)
  • Eric Hau, Radiation Oncologist, Crown Princess Mary Westmead Cancer Centre, Sydney (AU)
  • Andrew Potter, Radiation Oncologist, Adelaide Radiotherapy Centre, Adelaide (AU)

The course aims to:

  • Provide an introduction to radiation biology as applied to radiotherapy.
  • Cover the basic mechanisms of cell death/ survival and the radiation response of tumours and normal tissues.
  • Explain the formulas of tissue tolerance.
  • Describe the biological basis for current approaches to the improvement of radiotherapy including novel fractionation schemes, retreatment, IMRT, modification of hypoxia, hadron therapy, combined radiotherapy/chemotherapy and biological modifiers of tumour and normal tissue effects.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course participants should be able to:

  • Understand the biology of how ionizing radiation is able to effectively treat cancer
  • Distinguish radiotherapy and its advantages from other cancer therapies
  • Have the essential knowledge of radiobiology necessary for qualifying examinations.

Course Content

  • A series of basic lectures introducing molecular and clinical radiobiology
  • Mechanisms and models or radiation cell killing
  • The linear-quadratic approach to fractionation
  • Molecular basis of radiation response
  • Radiobiology and tolerance of normal tissues to (re)treatment
  • Alternative fractionation schedules in radiotherapy
  • Tumour hypoxia and the microenvironment
  • Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy
  • The volume and dose-rate effect in radiotherapy
  • Biological response modifiers (tumours, normal tissues) and molecular approaches to therapy
  • Protons and other particles in radiotherapy
  • Radiation-induced malignancies.

Prerequisites

Before commencing this course participants should:

  • Ensure their knowledge of basic biology and physics is at least high-school level
  • Familiarise themselves with access to the journals covering radiobiology related to radiotherapy.

Teaching Methods

  • 27 hours of lectures
  • 3 hours of tutorials
  • 4 hours of discussions.

Methods of Assessment

  • MCQ
  • Evaluation form.

Affiliations

 

Programme

Aavilable here

Key Words

Radiobiology, radiation biology, radiation oncology, radiotherapy.

Further information to follow..